Piglet 50p coin: how much is it worth?

THE Piglet 50p coin was the first in a series celebrating children's favourite Winnie the Pooh – we look at how rare it is, and how valuable it might be.

The animals of Hundred Acre Wood were celebrated by the Royal Mint when it launched a series of nine coins commemorating the popular characters.

Some rare coins sell for considerably more for their face value, so it's always worth checking your change for any hidden gems.

Look out for unusual designs such as the Snowman or Flopsy Bunny and you could be quids in.

The tales of Winnie the Pooh and his friends were written by A. A Milne and illustrated by E. H. Shepard, with the books first published in 1926.

The Piglet 50p was the first in the series designed to celebrate the "silly old bear" and was launched in 2020.

Since then, he has been joined by Tigger, Owl, Winnie the Pooh, Winnie the Pooh and Friends, and Christopher Robin coins.

The Piglet coin features a design of Piglet blowing a dandelion with a bumble bee underlining his name.

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All of the coins were designed using the original illustrations from the books, and the obverse features a portrait of the Queen.

You're not likely to find any of the characters from Hundred Acre Wood in your spare change unfortunately, as these are commemorative coins that are uncirculated.

You can buy all of the coins in the series directly from the Royal Mint, but they're £10 each – that's 20 times their face value if they were to be circulated.

According to Coin Checker, there were just 45,000 of the coins minted, and a further 18,000 silver proof and 525 gold proof coins.

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You could also pick up the coin online at sites such as Ebay.

When we looked, we saw one Piglet 50p had sold for £6.05 after receiving five bids – buyers had to pay an extra £1.29 postage on their purchase though.

Another sold for £3.99 with just one bid, with a postage cost of £2.93.

What to know about rare and valuable coins

If you spot a unique design on the 50ps in your change, you could find it's valuable, and could make a lot of money from it.

And if you're buying a coin online, you could spot a hidden gem for a bargain.

Either way, it's always best to do your research.

Find out how many were minted to get an idea of how scarce it is and what it might be worth.

Designs with a low mintage can be more valuable to collectors as they become increasingly difficult to find.

Search completed listings on Ebay to see what others are paying for the same coin – though you should bear in mind that sales can fall through after the auction ends.

You can check in with experts like Coin Hunter, Change Checker, or The Royal Mint though to see what your change is worth – they'll give you the most accurate result.

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