Piers Morgan really wants us to know he'll be back on TV 'soon'

Piers Morgan really wants us to know he’ll be returning to our TV imminently.

While it may not feel like it, the former Good Morning Britain host has largely been absent from our TV screens in a hosting capacity since walking out of GMB following comments on Meghan Markle in March.

Last week Ofcom announced that Piers didn’t breach the broadcasting code when he remarked that he didn’t believe Meghan’s claims that she experienced suicidal thoughts and was given no help by the Palace when she sought it, during an explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey.

While Piers – whose comments received 41,000 complaints in 24 hours – jokingly asked for his job back on GMB, his former co-host Susanna Reid said he wasn’t returning.

But he’s going to turn up somewhere.

Posing alongside a gaggle of his fans on Monday, Piers wrote: ‘Great to meet my Yorkshire fan club this morning. Thanks for all the support, ladies!

‘I’ll be back on TV soon, don’t worry.’

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It’s not the first time Piers has dangled the carrot of his TV return, insisting last week he’d received more job offers in the wake of Ofcom’s dismissal of the raft of complaints against him.

‘I put that post on social media asking if I’d get my job back to prove a point,’ he said of jokingly asking ITV for his job back. ‘I wouldn’t go back, not without a public apology and I’m not going to get one.

‘I’ve got much bigger things coming up. The future is exciting. The next project is global, it’s big.’

He added to Daily Mail: ‘I can’t say what but people are going to hear about it within the next few weeks.’

Piers has remained tight-lipped over what the ‘global’ project could be however he has hinted that he could resume his TV career in the States again or elsewhere abroad.

Speaking outside his home last Wednesday, he said: ‘I have had loads of offers and they have accelerated in the last 10 hours, as you can imagine, and I will take my free speech campaign around the world and all I require is to have an employer who believes in it as passionately as I do.’

He added: ‘I’m considering some very interesting offers right now and I will make a decision quite soon.’

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What is Ofcom and what does it cover?

Ofcom is the regulator for the communications services that we use and rely on each day.

The watchdog makes sure people get the best from their broadband, home phone and mobile services, as well as keeping an eye on TV and radio.

Ofcom deals with most content on television, radio and video-on-demand services, including the BBC. However, if your complaint is about something you saw or heard in a BBC programme, you may need to complain to the BBC first.

Its rules for television and radio programmes are set out in the Broadcasting Code.

The rules in the Broadcasting Code also apply to the BBC iPlayer.

This Broadcasting Code is the rule book that broadcasters have to follow and it covers a number of areas, including; protecting the under-18s, protecting audiences from harmful and/or offensive material and ensuring that news, in whatever form, is reported with due accuracy and presented with due impartiality.

Audiences can complain to Ofcom if they believe a breach of the Broadcasting Code has been made.

Every time Ofcom receives a complaint from a viewer or listener, they assess it to see if it needs further investigation.

If Ofcom decide to investigate, they will include the case in a list of new investigations, published in the Broadcast and On Demand Bulletin.

An investigation is a formal process which can take some time depending on the complexity of the issues involved.

Ofcom can also launch investigations in the absence of a complaint from a viewer or listener.

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