Air duty should be replaced by a frequent flyers' tax, says think-tank

Air duty should be scrapped and replaced by a frequent flyers’ tax to curb carbon emissions and help poorer families, says think-tank

  • A report has suggested replacing air passenger duty with a frequent flyers’ tax
  • Aviation needs to be slowed to meet Government’s emissions target, experts say
  • A think-tank says a levy on people who take 70% of all  flights could limit growth
  • Now, all UK travellers pay air passenger duty of around £13 for short-haul flights

Air passenger duty should be scrapped and replaced by a frequent flyers’ tax to help poorer families and curb carbon emissions, a report proposes.

To meet the Government’s pledge to deliver net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, growth in the aviation sector needs to be slowed, experts say.

The New Economics Foundation think-tank claims imposing a levy on the 15 per cent of people who take 70 per cent of all flights would be the fairest way to limit that growth.

A think-tank claims imposing a levy on the 15 per cent of people who take 70 per cent of all flights would be the fairest way to limit growth in the aviation industry (stock image)

Currently, all travellers flying from the UK pay air passenger duty of around £13 for short-haul flights and £78 for long haul. 

The think-tank proposes no tax on the first flight, £25 for a second, £60 for a third and so on.

Researcher Alex Chapman said: ‘A frequent flyer levy can not only reduce emissions to a level which avoids climate breakdown, but it can support the Government’s levelling-up agenda by improving access of the poorest groups to international travel.’ 

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