Bonfire Night 2021 live – Fireworks events and displays near me as urgent warning issued to millions with asthma

IT'S that time of year again – Bonfire Night is upon us once more.

With events more or less entirely called off due to covid last year, 2021 is a chance for families up and down the country to make up for lost time.

So whether you're looking for the best fireworks displays in your area, the latest weather forecasts or if you're simply hoping to bag some great Guy Fawkes-themed supermarket deals, we have you covered.

This live blog will cover absolutely everything Bonfire Night related so make it your one-stop shop for making plans and grabbing a bargain this year.

Read our Bonfire Night live blog below for the very latest updates…

  • Milica Cosic

    Fireworks were created by accident in ancient China

    Fireworks are incredibly ancient – they were first used in China during the Song dynasty between 960 and 1279.

    Firework making was a respected skill and the first rockets were made from rolled sheets of paper containing gunpowder and a fuse.

    Knowledge of the technique gradually drifted west as Arab explorers began moving east in the Middle Ages and bringing the knowledge back.

    Fireworks were first recorded in Europe by the late 14th century and became popular during the 17th century – just in time for Guy Fawkes’ night.

  • Milica Cosic

    Why do we use fireworks and bonfires?

    People first started lighting bonfires as a celebration that the king hadn’t been killed, and the tradition has carried on to this day.

    Fireworks are also set off throughout the country – representing the 36 barrels of gunpowder that were never used.

    Traditionally, the yeoman of the guard will still search the cellars of the Houses of Parliament before the state opening in November.

    However, it is a ceremonial gesture rather than an actual terrorist hunt, even using old lanterns.

    Funnily enough, and despite being the most famous member of the group, Guy Fawkes didn’t actually lead the plot – just got caught red handed.

    The ringleader of the plot was Robert Catesby.

  • Milica Cosic

    Six tips for asthmatics

    Asthma UK has issued top tips for people with asthma on bonfire night.

    1. Remember, remember… carry your reliever inhaler with you at all times
    2. Take your preventer medicines as prescribed
    3. If you find that smoke is making you cough, stand well back
    4. Make sure you friends and family know what to do and when to get help if your asthma symptoms suddenly get worse
    5. As cold air can be an asthma trigger, wrap a thing scarf loosely over your nose and mouth; this will help to warm up the air before you breathe it in
    6. Visit the Asthma UK website and share 'what to do in an asthma attack' with friends and family members
  • Milica Cosic

    Urgent warning issued to millions with asthma ahead of this weekend

    BRITS with asthma have been warned to start taking measures to protect themselves now in order to avoid a deadly attack this bonfire weekend.

    Particles of smoke caused by fireworks and bonfires could trigger symptoms in 3million asthma sufferers – making it hard for them to breathe.

    The particles of smoke can irritate the airways, causing sufferers to become inflamed and tighten.

    This results in coughing and wheezing and could result in a fatal asthma attack.

    If you are planning on going to a bonfire and firework display, you should stand well back and make sure you have your blue inhaler, usually the reliver inhaler, with you at all times.

  • Milica Cosic

    Aldi to the rescue

    You can get your fireworks from Aldi this year.

    The discount supermarket confirmed to The Sun that it would be selling normal fireworks, and has increased the number of low noise options this year too.

    All fireworks are labelled with a “volume rating”, so customers can pick and choose to buy quieter ones if they live with older people or have pets.

    Aldi hasn’t listed which fireworks are available to buy in stores yet – but said it would update its website soon with the options available.

    You can find where your nearest Aldi store is by using the supermarket’s online store checker tool.

  • Milica Cosic

    Sainsbury's isn't the only one banning fireworks

    According to Lonely Planet, Collecchio in the province of Parma, banned noisy fireworks due to concerns about the local fireworks in 2015.

    Fortunately, an Italian company – Setti Fireworks – was on hand and specialising in making SILENT fireworks.

  • Milica Cosic

    Mum shares savvy potato hack

    BONFIRE night is nearly upon us and a mum has shared her very savvy tip to preventing kids’ fingers getting burned on sparklers.

    Francesca Ross uploaded a photo showing how she sticks potatoes on the end of sparklers for her children to hold instead of the metal end.

    She wrote on the Facebook group Family Lowdown Tips & Ideas: “With bonfire night coming up I thought I'd share the potato trick we just did for the sparklers.

    “Worked amazing for the little toddlers.”

    Her post has racked up over a thousand likes, with one person writing: “Great idea!”

    Another added: “I find carrots and parsnips work best…abit longer and easier for the little 'uns to hold.”

    A mum has shared how she puts potatoes on the end of sparklers for her kids to hold so they don't get burned
  • Milica Cosic

    RSPCA find nearly half of all pets are scared of fireworks

    According to the RSPCA, 45% of pets have shown when hearing fireworks.

    A dog cannot understand that the bangs are just colourful rockets being fired into the sky and that they are safe with their humans.

    To help your pooch cope, before fireworks season starts the RSCPA recommends setting up a corner of your home just for your pet.

    This can be a warm, safe and possibly reasonably sound proof part of the house such as a kennel, a bed or under the stairs. Help the animal associate it with positive experiences such as putting their favourite toys in it.

    Hopefully the animal will go there when they get scared.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Duncan James compiles playlist of soothing songs for dogs

    BLUE star Duncan James is launching a bumper new music video of soothing songs to keep dogs calm on bonfire night after experts predicted an explosion of stressed-out pets this year.

    The six-hour long collection will include some of the first music that singer and actor Duncan has helped create since the chart-topping boyband split in 2005.

    Animal behaviourists from Burns Pet Nutrition have worked closely with All Rise singer and Masterchef quarter-finalist Duncan to curate music specially designed to help keep dogs calm when the rockets and roman candles are going off via a dedicated 6-hour You Tube video.

    Called Pet Sounds, this bespoke video and playlist will contain soothing music as well as offering top tips on how to keep dogs safe and calm on bonfire night.

    Dog-lover Duncan, 43, said: “Pet Sounds has been designed to help keep our dogs calm and minimise anxiety during the firework period. I love dogs and have grown up with them all my life so I hate to see any animal stressed and in fear.

    “We can’t stop the fireworks, so it’s up to all pet owners to do whatever they can to protect their animals. I hope the Pet Sounds will help them do that.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    Bonfire warning for Asthma sufferers

    Smoke particles irritate the airways, causing them to become inflamed and tighten, resulting in coughing and wheezing and making it very difficult for people to breathe.

    And the charity fear hospitalisations around the November celebrations will be plentiful due to the cold weather, cold and flu season and air pollution from the spectacles.

    An estimated three people die from an asthma attack every day, according to Asthma UK.

    Jessica Kirby, head of health advice at Asthma UK, said: "Fireworks and bonfire displays might look pretty but if you have asthma triggered by smoke, they could land you in hospital.

    "While many people will be looking forward to watching firework displays, the increased levels of smoke in the air can trigger asthma symptoms such as wheezing, coughing and shortness of breath or even an asthma attack.

    "The good news is if people follow our top tips such as taking their preventer inhaler (usually brown) as prescribed, keeping their reliever inhaler (usually blue) with them and making sure their family and friends know what to do if they have an asthma attack, they shouldn’t have to miss out on festivities."

  • Joseph Gamp

    Girl, 3, saves mum’s life after bonfire triggers asthma attack

    A quick-thinking three-year-old girl saved her mum's life after a bonfire triggered an asthma attack.

    Imogen bravely called 999 and directed an ambulance to the family home as her mum Kayleigh Robus, 29, struggled for breath.

    The pair were playing in the garden when the community carer suddenly felt her chest tighten and she was soon unable to speak. Terrified Kayleigh, of Burgess Hill, West Sussex, realised that the smoke from a nearby bonfire had triggered an asthma attack.

    The mum told The Argus: "I was playing in the garden with Imogen when suddenly I smelt smoke and straight away felt my chest tighten. I rushed inside the house and took puffs on my inhaler which helped at first but it wasn’t enough and I was struggling to breathe. I couldn’t breathe in or out, I couldn’t speak, I couldn’t do anything. It was horrific."

    As Kayleigh battled for breath, her toddler amazingly dialled 999 and told an ambulance where they lived.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Bonfire Night ‘Arctic blast’ to make Britain colder than ICELAND

    AN ARCTIC blast will make Britain colder than Iceland for Bonfire Night as temperatures plummet to -3C.

    The mercury has taken a tumble this week as a weather front straight from the frozen north takes hold across the country.

    In the Pennines, daytime temperatures won't rise above 5C – cooler than the 6C expected in Reykjavik. Aidan McGovern of the Met Office advised Brits to wrap up warm if they're off out to watch a fireworks display tomorrow night.

    He said today is "looking like a cracking day with plenty of sunshine" – but "temperatures are below average and it'll be distinctly cold in that northerly wind."

    Some in the south will wake to a sub-zero chill tomorrow, he said, adding: "By Friday morning, in sheltered inland parts out of the wind, there'll be a fairly widespread frost, with temperatures in the south as low as -3C."

  • Joseph Gamp

    Set off fireworks too early & risk a £5k fine

    On Bonfire Night, November 5, you can set off fireworks until midnight.

    And, on New Year’s Eve, Diwali and Chinese New Year fireworks are allowed up until 1am.

    Outside of these dates, you cannot set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am.

    You can be fined up to £5,000 and imprisoned for up to six months for selling or using fireworks illegally.

    You could also get an on-the-spot fine of £90 if you’re caught setting off fireworks at the wrong time.

  • Joseph Gamp

    London Fire Brigade tips for using fireworks safely

    The London Fire Brigade (LFB) has the following advice on letting off fireworks safely:

    • Only buy fireworks which carry the CE mark, keep them in a closed box and use them one at a time
    • Read and follow the instructions on each firework using a torch if necessary
    • Light the firework at arm's length with a taper (a long stick that's often included in the box with fireworks) and stand well back
    • Keep naked flames, including cigarettes, away from fireworks
    • Never return to a firework once it has been lit
    • Don't put fireworks in pockets and never throw them
    • Direct any rocket fireworks well away from spectators
    • Always keep a bucket of water or a hosepipe nearby in case of emergency

    Tips for minimising impact of fireworks on neighbours

    Environmental Protection UK has the following advice about home firework displays:

    • Tell your neighbours – and if a neighbour complains that you are disturbing them be considerate
    • Use appropriate fireworks – when buying fireworks, try to avoid noisy ones in sensitive locations
    • Make sure pets and other animals are safely away from fireworks
    • Complete your firework display within the permitted times
    • Avoid letting off fireworks in unsuitable weather
    • Let off your fireworks in an open garden area – noise bounces off buildings and smoke and pollution can build up in enclosed spaces
    • Joseph Gamp

      Calls to ban sales of fireworks over animal stress

      There have been calls to ban fireworks sales because of the stress they cause to wild and domestic animals.

      Stores like Tesco and Asda are selling budget fireworks for the big night.

      And, Sainsbury’s has refused to sell fireworks altogether this year.

    • Joseph Gamp

      Can I let off fireworks on my rented property?

      Tenancy agreements often prohibit bonfires or fireworks, so check your agreement or ask your landlord if you are unsure.

      It is legal for a landlord to ban the use of fireworks in a tenancy agreement.

      Your agreement may also state that you must not engage in antisocial behaviour or cause noise pollution, which may include letting off fireworks.

      It is, therefore, a good idea to check with your landlord and neighbours if you plan to hold a fireworks display.

    • Joseph Gamp

      When can I start setting off fireworks?

      If you prefer to do things yourself, it’s worth taking note of the laws around when it’s legal or illegal to set off fireworks.

      Usually, it’s against the law to set off fireworks between the hours of 11pm and 7am – however, this is relaxed on special occasions.

      For Bonfire Night, the curfew is extended to midnight.

      On New Year’s Eve, it’s legal to set off fireworks until 1am.

    • Joseph Gamp

      Best bonfires in SW England

      Arno’s Vale Bonfire Night, Bristol – November 5

      Fireworks to Music at Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park, Bristol – November 5-7

      Truro Bonfire Night, Cornwall – November 5

      Ottery St Mary, Devon, November 5

      Kenilworth Castle, Warwickshire, 3 November

    • Joseph Gamp

      Why do we use fireworks and bonfires?

      People first started lighting bonfires as a celebration that the king hadn’t been killed, and the tradition has carried on to this day.

      Fireworks are also set off throughout the country – representing the 36 barrels of gunpowder that were never used.

      Traditionally, the yeoman of the guard will still search the cellars of the Houses of Parliament before the state opening in November.

      However, it is a ceremonial gesture rather than an actual terrorist hunt, even using old lanterns.

      Funnily enough, and despite being the most famous member of the group, Guy Fawkes didn’t actually lead the plot – just got caught red handed.

      The ringleader of the plot was Robert Catesby.

    • Joseph Gamp

      The Firework Code

      The RSPA has its very own Firework code published on its website.

      It does recommend going to an organised display but if you do want to have a your own fireworks display these are its top tips:

      1. Plan your firework display to make it safe and enjoyable, and check the time you can legally set off fireworks
      2. Only buy fireworks which carry the CE or UKCA marks, keep them in a closed box, and use them one at a time
      3. Read and follow the instructions on each firework using a torch if necessary
      4. Light the firework at arm’s length with a taper and stand well back
      5. Keep naked flames, including cigarettes, away from fireworks
      6. Never return to a firework once it has been lit
      7. Don’t put fireworks in pockets and never throw them
      8. Direct any rocket fireworks well away from spectators
      9. Never use paraffin or petrol on a bonfire
      10. Make sure that the fire is out and surroundings are made safe before leaving.
    • Joseph Gamp

      Is it illegal to use fireworks?

      It is illegal for anyone under the age of 18 to buy, handle or set up an firework more powerful than a sparkler.

      It is also illegal to set off fireworks between 11pm and 7am except on special occasions.

      Bonfire Night is one of the exceptions were fireworks can be used till midnight.

      For New Year’s Eve, Diwali and Chinese New Year the cut off is 1am.

    • Joseph Gamp

      Advice on how to safely use fireworks

      As fireworks can be dangerous it is important to be very careful and take precautions on Bonfire Night:

      • Make sure that you’re buying your fireworks from somewhere reputable, for example: a supermarket or a specialist party retailer.
      • Do not buy fireworks if the boxes look like they’ve been tampered with or damaged.
      • Always read the packet carefully and make sure that the fireworks you buy are suitable for the place where you are going to set them off. Some fireworks can only be bought and used by professionals.
      • Just one person should be in charge of fireworks, and this person should be sober.
      • Always make sure you preparing in advance and in daylight.
      • You should light fireworks at arm’s length using a taper and stand well back.
      • Sparklers can reportedly get five times hotter than cooking oil – so never give them to a child under five and make sure to wear gloves when you light them.

      Fireworks were created by accident in ancient China

      Fireworks are incredibly ancient – they were first used in China during the Song dynasty between 960 and 1279.

      Firework making was a respected skill and the first rockets were made from rolled sheets of paper containing gunpowder and a fuse.

      Knowledge of the technique gradually drifted west as Arab explorers began moving east in the Middle Ages and bringing the knowledge back.

      Fireworks were first recorded in Europe by the late 14th century and became popular during the 17th century – just in time for Guy Fawkes’ night.

      RSPCA advice for dogs on Bonfire Night

      The RSPCA have information on how you can reduce the risk of stress to your beloved pet this Bonfire night.

      They suggest taking your pet out for a walk during the day to avoid stressing them with an evening walk.

      It will also be a good idea to put on the TV or music to drown out the sound of the loud fireworks.

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