Grade II listed water tower is transformed into £595k three-bed home

Fancy splashing out? Grade II listed 50ft high water tower built in 1853 is transformed into £595k three-bed home after undergoing Grand Designs-style conversion

  • The tower was originally built in 1853 and supplied water to the town of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Leicestershire 
  • The building’s change of use was subject to protests from a town’s Civic Society as well as English Heritage 
  • But the project went ahead and now the 50ft-tall tower has been converted into stunning contemporary home

A Grade II listed water tower which has undergone a Grand Designs-style conversion has been put on the market for £595,000.

The 50ft-tall tower was originally built in 1853 and supplied water to the town of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Leicestershire. 

The building’s change of use was subject to protests from the town’s Civic Society as well as English Heritage but the project went ahead and has now been converted into a stunning contemporary home.

This Grade II listed water tower, which has undergone a Grand Designs-style conversion (pictured), has been put on the market for £595,000

The building’s change of use was subject to protests from the town’s Civic Society as well as English Heritage but now boasts an open plan living-dining area (pictured) and kitchen

The stunning contemporary home now incorporates a master bedroom suite (pictured) which boasts its own mezzanine bathroom

Outside the property (pictured) has automated wrought iron gates leading to a shared entrance driveway with a further gateway leads to the private, gravelled driveway which provides parking for The Water Tower

The property now boasts an open plan living-dining and kitchen area, a reception hall, a master bedroom suite with a mezzanine bathroom and two further bedrooms and a shower room over three floors.  

The conversion was completed in 2016 and won an LABC award in 2016 for the best re-use or conversion of an existing building.

The design has incorporated many original features, including the building’s stonework and the original cast iron pipework which was used to drain the water tank when the building was in operation.

The dining area has double-height, curved glass with south-facing views and the master bedroom also has a full-height curved glass wall to make the most of the vista.

There are two further bedrooms (one pictured) and a shower room set over three floors in the 50ft-tall Grade II listed water tower

The conversion was completed in 2016 (pictured) and won an LABC award in 2016 for the best re-use or conversion of an existing building

The contemporary home has recently been put on the market for £595,000 after its Grand Designs-style conversion (open-plan kitchen diner pictured)

The master bedroom (pictured) also has a full-height curved glass wall to make the most of the vista over the area of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Leicestershire

The tower’s former water tank is empty but can be accessed via a loft ladder and could be converted to a gym or studio, if planning permission allowed.

Outside the property has automated wrought iron gates leading to a shared entrance driveway with a further gateway leads to the private, gravelled driveway which provides parking for The Water Tower.

Estate agent Ben Longstaff, of Fisher German, who are handling the sale, said the property belonged to a developer and a jewellery designer, who had converted the tower themselves.


The tower’s former water tank is empty but can be accessed via a loft ladder and could be converted to a gym or studio, if planning permission allowed

The design has incorporated many original features including the building’s stonework and much of the original cast iron pipework (kitchen pictured)

Estate agent Ben Longstaff, of Fisher German, who are handling the sale, said the property belonged to a developer and a jewellery designer, who had converted the tower themselves (mezzanine bathroom pictured)

He said: ‘They have loved living there but they like a challenge and so are leaving to do another conversion elsewhere.

‘It would suit people looking for a holiday home, active downsizers or a family with older children, or people who appreciate architecture.

‘It’s such an unusual place that people might want to own it just because of that.’

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