Hero who fought off London Bridge attack says Trump encourages terror

Hero who fought off London Bridge attacker with a narwhal tusk accuses Donald Trump of encouraging future terrorists with his actions in Middle East

  • Darryn Frost, 38, fought off Usman Khan with a narwhal tusk in November attack
  • He now claims Trump’s decision to kill Soleimani could cause ‘terrorists to rise’
  • ‘What feeds terror is actions like this where people in power act as judge’, he said

Pictured: Darryn Frost, who fought off the London Bridge attacker with a narwhal tusk

A brave civil servant who fought off London Bridge terrorist Usman Khan with a narwhal tusk has accused Donald Trump of ‘feeding terror’ with his actions in the Middle East.

Darryn Frost, 38, grabbed the artefact from the wall in Fishmongers’ Hall, at the north end of the bridge, as Khan killed two and injured several more in a knife rampage during a prisoner rehabilitation event on November 29.

Mr Frost, a South African who works in the Ministry of Justice communications department and has lived in Britain for 14 years, was filmed fighting Khan, who was running at people with knives taped to his wrists. 

Speaking to the Guardian, Mr Frost said Trump’s decision to kill Iranian military commander Qassem Soleimani in a drone strike on Baghdad airport would cause ‘the next generation of terrorists’ to rise.

The US strike has heightened tensions in the Middle East, with Iran launching missile attacks on at least Iraqi bases housing US forces in Al Asad and Irbil days later in retaliation.  

He said: ‘The next generation of terrorists will rise as a direct result of these actions and we must condemn them now’. 

Mr Frost has previously described how he grabbed the ornamental tusk from the wall during the November attack and used it against Khan as another man kept the terrorist at bay with a wooden chair. 

Mr Frost, 38, grabbed the artefact from the wall in Fishmongers’ Hall, at the north end of the bridge, as Usman Khan killed two and injured several more in a knife rampage

‘When we heard the noise from the floor below, a few of us rushed to the scene,’ he said. ‘I took a narwhal tusk from the wall and used it to defend myself and others from the attacker. Another man was holding the attacker at bay with a wooden chair’. 

‘I ran down the stairs, stood next to the man with the chair, and the two of us confronted the attacker.’ 

Following the attack, which claimed the lives of Cambridge graduates Jack Merritt and Saskia Jones, the civil servant has launched Extinguish Hate. 

The campaign aims to promote ‘relentless kindness and understanding’ as an ‘antidote to extremism’ rather than ‘extreme punishment or intolerance’.


 The London Bridge attack claimed the lives of Cambridge graduates Jack Merritt (left) and Saskia Jones (right)

Forensic officers investigate the scene of the London Bridge terror attack on November 30

‘Their deaths have created a drive within me to challenge hatred and intolerance,’ Mr Frost said. ‘What feeds terror is actions like this where people in power act as judge, jury and executioner across borders and jurisdictions. Who is Trump that he can have this sort of impact across all our lives? 

‘Khan may have come from this country so people may not understand why he was extreme. The people who influenced him are likely to be the people who have lost loved ones because of our actions abroad.’

Footage from the London Bridge attack shows Mr Frost pinning Khan to the ground before he is pulled away by a police officer and the terrorist is shot dead seconds later. 

Speaking previously about the attack, he said: ‘He had knives in both hands and, upon seeing me with the narwhal tusk, pointed at his midriff he turned and spoke to me, then indicated he had an explosive device around his waist. 

Mr Frost said Trump’s decision to kill Iranian military commander Qassem Soleimani in a drone strike on Baghdad airport would cause ‘the next generation of terrorists’ to rise

‘At this point, the man next to me threw his chair at the attacker, who then started running towards him with knives raised above his head.’ 

Mr Frost then passed the tusk to his unarmed comrade before racing back upstairs to find another to use. 

When he returned, he found the first tusk ‘shattered across the floor’ and saw people fleeing the building.

He said: ‘Along with others, I pursued the attacker, tusk in hand, on to the bridge. We called out to warn the public of the danger and, after a struggle, managed to restrain him to the ground.’

Mr Frost added: ‘At that point I was trying to isolate the blades by holding his wrists so that he could not hurt anyone or set off the device.’

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