Struggling families could get up to $3,600 Covid stimulus check for every child under new Dem plan – here's how

STRUGGLING families could get up to $3,600 in a Covid stimulus check for every child under a new bill proposed by the Democrats.

The bill, which will be proposed today, is spearheaded by Richard Neal, the chairman of the House's Ways and Means Committee, which is seeking to bring millions of kids out of poverty.



"The pandemic is driving families deeper and deeper into poverty, and it's devastating," Neal said in a statement provided to CNN.

"We are making the Child Tax Credit more generous, more accessible, and by paying it out monthly, this money is going to be the difference in a roof over someone's head or food on their table."

If the 22-page bill passes, the IRS would begin sending monthly checks of at least $250 to millions of families, the Washington Post reported.

The legislation would provide $3,600 per child under the age of six and $3,000 per child age six to 17 for one year.

The benefit would only available to single parents earning up to $75,000 annually and for couples earning up to $150,000.

According to CNN, families will receive the Child Tax Credit payments would begin in July.

Yesterday progressives like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called for Americans to receive $2,000 stimulus checks as opposed to $1,400-per-person proposal.

Senator Bernie Sanders, the new chairman of teh Senate Budget Committee, did't push back against Biden's $1,400 check proposal but did insist that Americans making $75,000 and under remain eligible for assistance.

"We said we're going to get you $2,000, which is $600 plus $1,400, and what we’re going to do is say that everybody, a single person, individual, $75,000 or lower, and a couple of $150,000 or lower will be eligible for that $2,000 – $600 plus $1,400," Sanders said during an appearance on "State of the Union" on Sunday.

'OPEN TO COMPROMISE'

"To say to a worker in Vermont or California or anyplace else that if you're making $52,000 a year, you are too rich to get this help, the full benefit, I think that that's absurd, and it's also, from a political point of view, a little bit absurd that you would have, under Trump, these folks getting the benefit, but under Biden, who is fighting hard for the working class of this country, they would not get that full benefit," Sanders continued.

President Biden is reportedly open to compromising the structure of the proposed checks in his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package.

He told House Democrats last Wednesday that he would be open to modifying the gross income thresholds for an additional round of payments but is holding to the $1,4000 check amounts, reports Politico.

Yesterday Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said on Sunday that American workers who earn up to $60,000 per year should receive stimulus checks as part of the White House relief package.

Speaking Sunday on CNN and CBS, the Treasury secretary said: “The exact details of how it should be targeted are to be determined, but struggling middle class families need help.”

Yellen went on to apply the argument to elementary school teachers and police officers making $60,000 income a year, saying, “It certainly seems appropriate that they can use that help to address the extra burdens from the pandemic.”

Yellen added: “President (Joe) Biden is certainly willing to work with members of Congress to define what’s fair and he wouldn’t want to see a household making over $300,000 receive these payments.”

She went on: “It has to go to people and households that do need the money and those are lower income households.”

It comes as two-thirds of Americans approved of President Biden's response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Meanwhile, a new poll, by Ipsos in partnership with ABC News, found that an approval rating of 96% of Democrats, 67% of Independents and 33% of Republicans.

The poll also found that nearly nine in ten Americans backing more relief however the country is split over the approach.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at a briefing on Friday: "The president ran on unifying the country and putting forward ideas that would help address the crises we're facing.

"He didn't run on a promise to unite the Democratic and Republican Party into one party in Washington.

"This package has the vast majority of support from the American public.


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